Cary Bowen

Friday, June 20, 2014

Field...Work Hard

 
Of course, the last day at Villa Carmen is the day the sun shines. It is supposed to be the beginning of the dry season, yet we have had rain everyday. Only two days were dry enough in the afternoons for me to enjoy a sampling period. I had one full day of sampling without rain at the beginning of our stay here, and then there’s today.

Today is packing day, but I was able to sample for a few hours this morning. I am surveying the diversity of orchid bees, Euglossini. Some species are a beautiful metallic color; others are fuzzier and yellow and black striped. This is KU’s 4th season to survey these bees in this corner of the Amazon basin*. The males collect pheromones from volatile compounds, such as eucalyptus. It’s unknown if they do this for mating behavior or another purpose. I apply various scents to cardboard squares, as baits to attract the bees. Once they are distracted by the scent and hanging out at the bait, I net them, document the bee and scent in my field notebook, and retain the tagged specimen for lab study. It is surprising how sophisticated is their eyesight. I swear they see me and hover at the bait, sometimes, staring directly at me. Today, they loved the purple verbena in the garden.

Euglossini, Orchid Bees, are known to pollinate orchids and many other plants. Around here they are also pollinators of the Brazil nut tree, an important indigenous tree. We commonly eat Brazil nuts in party nut mixes. Since there aren’t any orchid bees at Wayqecha, one begs the question, “What pollinates the amazing number of high-Andean orchids?”

In the field, you never know what environmental conditions you’re going to get. It’s one of the things I love about it and one of the things that people, who prefer to work in a lab, hate about it. -Carey Bowen

*See Niemack, R. S., D. J. Bennett, I. Hinojosa-Diaz, and C. S. Chaboo. 2012. A contribution to the knowledge of the orchid bees of the Los Amigos Biological Station, Madre de Dios, Peru (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Euglossini). Check List. 8(2):215-217.

Saturday, June 14, 2014

In a state of Malaise...traps

 
It is now my tenth day in Peru. The rest of the group arrived after I’d been here, alone, for four days. We spent the first couple of days in Lima touring archeological sites and gaining an overview of Peru’s rich history and ancient cultures.

Of course, there was a bit of a snafu at the Lima airport with one of our colleague’s ticket, but thankfully, it was sorted out. I flew a different airline from the rest, since it was a bit cheaper and by the time I was able to purchase my ticket, it was outrageously priced with their airline. So, I arrived in Cusco a few minutes before them and was inundated by organizations trying to sell me everything from a taxi to a hotel to Macchu Picchu entrance tickets. My Spanish has been improving, so I felt fairly safe in communicating with the vendors that no, I did not need anything, I was waiting on my group to arrive. They seemed to get it, or I frightened them.

Wayqecha, our first field station, is in the Andean cloud forest. I may now live in Lawrence, KS, the coldest place on earth, but I still am no fan of cold. One night at Wayqecha was so cold I slept under 4 heavy wool blankets wearing my long underwear, sweatshirt, and an alpaca shawl I had purchased in Lima. The next day I was in shorts.

We discovered that the forests are constantly trying to reclaim trails (trochas) as things grow so fast. We had a little difficulty locating the trail that our professor had previously surveyed. A small building had been built in front of it, that will eventually allow ACA to charge admission to enter this trail to the canopy platform which is supposed to be breathtaking. The vista at Wayqecha is breathtaking, so I have my doubts as to how spectacular this other view must be.

Today, we learned how to select a site for a Malaise Trap, and setting it up for capturing insects in an unattended sampling period. Our location wasn’t ideal for the trap itself as we installed it on a steep slope but it was in an ideal cloud forest, which we wanted to survey. In a week we’ll see if we made the right decision.

Monday, June 9, 2014

Macchu Picchu or Bust

 
Buenos noches desde Lima, Peru! I have been in Peru a few days, prior to the class arrival. It has already been adventure. My luggage was delayed two nights; I was pickpocketed; I got lost walking through Centro de Lima, and then found, grateful for the friendly Limeños. I have enjoyed seeing the beautiful brown faces and smiles and listening to the sing song pattern of their Spanish.

About five years ago, I was sitting in a long meditation with my Kundalini sangha when an image of myself meditating at Macchu Picchu began to dominate my experience. Since that first occurrence, I have been drawn to Peru. In January, I realized traveling to Peru might be attainable during a phone conversation with Dr. Chaboo. From that moment I began the long process of making vision a reality.

It was an extremely difficult journey to begin, since I was also coping with family illness. I nearly gave up, thinking it may be best for me to remain at home. In the end I boarded the first of three flights to arrive in Lima, alone and without my luggage or my Spanish-English dictionary. Always write down your hotel information and stash an extra pair of clothes and your toothbrush in your carry-on bag. This is what saved my sanity upon a less-than-perfect arrival and allowed me to be safely deposited at our hotel to begin this Peruvian adventure.

-Carey