Dan Bennett

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Bat Visitors Offer Insect Opportunity

batsWe occasionally noticed a bat flying around our lab space but didn’t pay too much attention to it. On our last night however, when it was unseasonably cold, several bats decided to use our lab as shelter. Often when the door opened one would fly in and around and then perch underneath one of our lab benches; five in fact were roosting together there at one point. I didn’t think too much of it until I recalled that bats have some pretty bizarre fly parasites that wander about through their fur. Suddenly this became an opportunity to make a novel entomological find. So eventually we got one in a butterfly net, and, while Choru held it down, I picked off the small flies with forceps. We let the bat go outside, but I suspect it may have flown right back in again.

—Dan Bennett

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Hymenoptera Impressions, part II

collectingwaspsOther obvious hymenopterans at our field site include the eusocial wasps of the family Vespidae. Sure, in the temperate regions we have our hornet nests and paper-wasp nests, but these types of wasps really become conspicuous in the tropics. There are just so many more elaborate mud and paper domiciles hanging about trees, bushes, and buildings built by a number of interesting genera that are sadly missing from higher latitudes. In fact on one cool day, when few insects were flying about, I took the opportunity to collect these nests and their occupants. The lower activity levels due to the cooler temperature made the whole endeavor a bit less risky. Indeed, 12 nests and about 2500 wasps later I was only attacked once!

—Dan Bennett

Sunday, July 11, 2010

Monkeys vs. Birds

Researchers

monkeys

A very nice colony of oropendola birds was nesting outside our lab. We became accustomed to their comings and goings and admired their long, basket-like nests and gargling calls. They always seemed to come and go together and did so with much fanfare. One afternoon however, while the birds were away, three capuchin monkeys raided their nests, and we were lucky to see it. The capuchins systematically went to each one, inserted their heads and torsos into the long nests, pulled out the oropendola eggs, and ate them right there in front of us. It was quite shocking. Of course we were sad on behalf of the birds, yet at the same time excited to witness such drama. 

—Dan Bennett