Rich Glor

Rich Glor

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Herpetology Lunch Begins for Fall Term

herpetology lunch group

We are having a great start with our Friday Herpetology Lunch meetings for the Fall term. Our lunch on Friday, August 29th included 18 individuals representing seven countries (USA, Brazil, India, Malaysia, China/Tibet, Ecuador, Taiwan). Curator Rich Glor discussed how to assist with development of the division's new website and curatorial assistant Matt Buehler shared some examples of problematic specimens recovered during an assessment of the snake collection.

Friday, July 11, 2014

Snake Skin Identification Challenge

Shed

Shed

A friend of KU Herpetology in the Endowment office would like to know if we have any thoughts on the identify of the snake whose shed skin was found by some kids heading into a hole near her garage. The sender notes that while the images are reasonably well-lit and in-focus compared to the photos we usually receive that the basket weave chair may have been included to challenge us. Best guess wins a point in the KU Center for Herpetological Accuracy's Annual herp identification contest.

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Herpetology Hosts K State REU Students

K State Tour

On Thursday, July 10th, KU Herpetology curator Rich Glor hosted a field trip by undergraduate students in the Kansas State Summer REU program under the direction of Drs. Bruce Snyder and Ted Morgan. The long-running K State REU program is analagous to KU's own REU program in ecology and evolutionary biology and has seen completion of a range of interesting undergraduate projects and publications, many relating to biodiversity science.  The members of the K State proved an impressive and engaged group with plenty of good questions. 

Monday, May 12, 2014

One Kinky Snake

Kinky snake.

The snake photograph above was just taken by a Lawrence resident near the intersection of Kasold and Princeton streets. The snake is clearly a black ratsnake (Pantherophi obsoletu), but why is it so kinky? Did it just swallow a string of ping pong balls? Snake expert and former KU Herpetology trainee Harry Greene offered one possible explanation: "My hunch is that it's root mimicry, a last ditch effort at crypsis--but then I've been accused of seeing mimicry everywhere!"

Monday, May 12, 2014

There's a Copperhead in My Basement

Ventral surface of snake found in basement.

The herpetology division regularly receives requests for help with snake identification. In most cases, this involves a snake that somebody thinks is venomous on or near their home. We recently received a call from someone near Lawrence who believed they had a Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) in their basement. We asked for a photo and description of the snake, but initially received only the blurry ventral photo above. What do you think? Is this a Copperhead?