Wednesday, January 30, 2013
Caroline Chaboo

Luis Figueroa in our visitor’s cubicle

In my academic calendar, January is usually preoccupied with completing annual evaluations and submitting reports, and grant applications to the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF). Our Entomology Division was uncommonly busy with several scientists travelling here to study parts of our Hymenoptera, Hemiptera, and Coleoptera collections. 

Mr. Luis Figueroa, a colleague from San Marcos University Museum, Lima, Peru spent a month here studying the scarab beetles that I and my team have collected over several years from Peru. Luis identified many specimens and even found a potentially new species that he and collaborators will study further and perhaps describe as new to science. It is exciting when collections for my own research can benefit other colleagues’ work! 

Dr. Paul Tinerella of the University of Minnesota-St. Paul (http://www.nepomorpha.org/), his doctoral student Gretchen Wilbrandt, and one undergraduate REU-supported researcher, Ms. Jamee Snyder (Fig. 1) visited us to examine our famous Hemiptera (true bugs) collection. Even though we have no active Hemiptera researcher on staff now and this part of the collection is not growing as fast as other taxa, our collection remains a valuable resource to the international community. We are one of 34 museums collaborating in the NSF-supported project http://tcn.amnh.org/, led by Dr. Toby Schuh at the American Museum of Natural History, to digitize and recurate North American Hemiptera specimens and make data available online.

Tuesday, November 20, 2012
Caroline Chaboo

Two M.Sc. students in the Chaboo lab presented posters on their research at the annual meeting of the the Entomological Society of America, Knoxville, TN, 11-14 November 2012. The ESA is the largest professional entomological organization in the world, and the annual meeting is a great place to contact other entomologists. Mabel and Sofia were able to get feedback and ideas to improve their research, while catching up many interesting talks in beetle systematics, genomics, climate change, and fieldwork.

Saturday, November 10, 2012
Caroline Chaboo

SEP attendees viewing the Gimmel & Chaboo poster

Luis Figueroa at the SEP congress

Members of the Chaboo lab made presentations at the 54th Peruvian Congress of Entomology, organized by the Peruvian Entomological Society (SEP), during November 5-8, 2012, in Cusco, Peru.  Graduate student Mabel Alvarado presented two posters, “Diversidad del genero Ophion (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Ophioninae) en la Zona Reservada Udima, Cajamarca, Perú” [co-author Luis A. Figueroa, Diversity of the genus Ophion (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Ophioninae) in Udima Reserve, Cajamarca, Peru] and  “Tres nuevas especies del genero Ateleute Förster (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Cryptinae) con claves para las especies del Nuevo Mundo” [Three new species of genus Ateleute Förster (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Cryptinae) with a key to the New World species].  Drs. Matthew Gimmel and Caroline Chaboo also presented the poster, “Las familias de Coleópteros de Perú” [Beetle families of Peru]. We thank Luis for his great help in so many ways with our field research in Peru and in getting our posters to the meeting.

Tuesday, October 9, 2012
Caroline Chaboo

Insect forensics

When a chief of police contacts you about insects and dead bodies, a good entomologist hopes that her skills are badly needed to solve the crime of the century…that the insects found on the body are clues to the time and place of death. One of the critical roles of insects in any ecosystem is to break down dead bodies, and this is what they naturally do with any carcass.

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Tuesday, October 9, 2012
Caroline Chaboo

When a chief of police contacts you about insects and dead bodies, a good entomologist hopes that her skills are badly needed to solve the crime of the century…that the insects found on the body are clues to the time and place of death. One of the critical roles of insects in any ecosystem is to break down dead bodies, and this is what they naturally do with any carcass. The first handbook for coroners was written by Song Ci in 13th century China; since then, this field has become professionalized and there is even a North American Forensic Entomology Association. One CSI team member is a forensic entomologist and a real life expert is a consultant for the series (us bug people are hyper-alert to these parts the show!). But back to my police chief. He sent me some photos and sure enough, a carcass….of a dead bird in western Pennsylvania. Riddled with lovely beetles doing their thing: eating it up!

These were Nicrophorus of the family Silphidae, but the species identification would require close examination of the the orange pattern on the elytra (hind wings). They were not Nicrophorus americanus, which is commonly called the endangered burying beetle as it is found in less than 10% of its historic range of distribution. Nicrophorus beetles show an unusual behavior of elaborate parental care: the carcass becomes the site of courtship, and the male and female bury the carcass so they and their offspring can feed. Aren’t insects bizarre and wonderful?

Friday, October 5, 2012
Jennifer Humphrey

From small towns in Kansas to Chicago to New York, Lewis Lindsay Dyche thrilled audiences with his skill in natural history displays and later with lectures about his adventures. Many of the glass slides that he displayed in these "magic lantern" talks have not been seen by the public in more than 100 years and will be featured in an exhibition opening and major public event on Nov. 4 at the University of Kansas. For more information about these and other events, visit  http://naturalhistory.ku.edu/events

Friday, September 28, 2012
Caroline Chaboo

Please congratulate Dr. Matthew Gimmel on his acceptance of a 2.5 year European Social Fund postdoctoral fellowship to work on beetle systematics in the lab of Dr. Milada Bocakova, Department of Biology, Palacký University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. Since graduating from Louisiana State University (Dr. Chris Carlton's lab), Matt has worked as my lab manager, helping so much with my Peru project: processing an unbelievable amount of specimens, overseeing undergraduate assistants, helping to mentor undergraduate researchers in their manuscripts. Indeed, his enormous knowledge of beetles, coupled with his generosity, patience, and enthusiasm, has made him a wonderful mentor to all in our unit. Now, we must race to submit our first manuscript together — on Peru beetles, of course - before he departs Kansas for Europe.

Friday, September 28, 2012
Caroline Chaboo

Caroline ChabooThe Chaboo lab hosted Sara López from the Ciudad Universitaria (UNAM) and the Departament of Zoology, National Collection of Insects, Mexico City, Mexico. Sara is conducting M.Sc. research on a revision and phylogeny of the genus, Ogdoecosta (Cassidinae: Mesomphaliini). Several cassidine genera have most of their species distributed in Mexico, and Ogdoecosta is one of them. Sara’s phylogenetic matrix will open new research into the biology of this little known group. We had a super time discussing morphology, characters, biology, and combing historical literature for clues of new characters, to understand how important researchers like Spaeth and Boheman defined the genus and species. Good luck to Sara in completing this important new work in Cassidinae and in becoming a badly-needed expert of the Mexican chrysomelid fauna.

Wednesday, August 22, 2012
Edward Wiley

The Aug. 6 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences  included a large-scale analysis of bony fishes using DNA sequencing. One of the major conclusions is that tarpons, eels and their relatives (Elopomorpha) is the sister group (branched first) of all living teleosts.

Gloria Arratia, research associate in ichthyology, first published this idea in 1997 (see reference 11 in the PNAS paper). Her conclusion was based on morphology. In short, molecular analysis  confirms a careful morphological analysis conducted about 15 years ago. More interesting is the fact that Gloria’s results were not widely accepted because the dominant figures in the field had championed the idea that the Osteoglossomorpha (mooneyes and bonytongues) were below the tarpons and eels on the tree. This inhibited some other ichthyologists from accepting Gloria's findings, in spite of the fact that she had the evidence and presented it clearly. 

—Ed

Friday, August 17, 2012
Rafe Brown

The Biodiversity Institute was well represented at the 7th World Congress of Herpetology held on August 8–13 in Vancouver, Canada. Among the 1700+ delegates from 41 countries were Rafe Brown, Bill Duellman, Linda Trueb, KU undergraduates, our new curator, Dr. Rich Glor, and 19 former herpetology students who had received PhDs at KU between 1974 and 2012. Among them was Dr. Joseph R. Mendelson III (PhD, 1997), now president of the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.