Idea Café - Shifting Viewpoints: Is Western Science an Indigenous Knowledge?

Subtitle: 
Jorge Soberon, Senior Research Scientist, Biodiversity Institute & Biodiversity Modeling and Policy Professor, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Professor
Event Type: 
General
Date: 
Fri, 12/06/2013 - 10:00am - 11:00am
Location: 
Spooner Hall/The Commons
Contact: 

Questions? Call 785.864.6293 or contact us at thecommons@ku.edu

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So called Indigenous, or Traditional Knowledge (ITK) is viewed by many western scientists with a combination of amusement and doubt, and almost always, implicit judgement. But what if we apply the methods of analysing ITK to western science? After all, western science began its long walk to hegemony as the folk knowledge of the peoples of the Mediterranean region. This exercise will likely prove both illuminating and humbling.

Central Highlands

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The Central American collection consists of ceramics, and a limited number of stone artifacts from Costa Rica, Panama, and Nicaragua. All of the items were donated and site affiliation is largely unavailable. The collections are arranged and described by cultural and temporal order, with representative items pictured below. The geographic/cultural areas of Costa Rica include the Greater Nicoya, the Diquis subregion, and the Central Region. The latter can be subdivided into to Atlantic Watershed and the central Mountain region.

Central Atlantic Watershed

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The Central American collection consists of ceramics, and a limited number of stone artifacts from Costa Rica, Panama, and Nicaragua. All of the items were donated and site affiliation is largely unavailable. The collections are arranged and described by cultural and temporal order, with representative items pictured below. The geographic/cultural areas of Costa Rica include the Greater Nicoya, the Diquis subregion, and the Central Region. The latter can be subdivided into to Atlantic Watershed and the central Mountain region.

Diquis

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Image: 

The Central American collection consists of ceramics, and a limited number of stone artifacts from Costa Rica, Panama, and Nicaragua. All of the items were donated and site affiliation is largely unavailable. The collections are arranged and described by cultural and temporal order, with representative items pictured below. The geographic/cultural areas of Costa Rica include the Greater Nicoya, the Diquis subregion, and the Central Region. The latter can be subdivided into to Atlantic Watershed and the central Mountain region.

Gran Nicoya

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The Central American collection consists of ceramics, and a limited number of stone artifacts from Costa Rica, Panama, and Nicaragua. All of the items were donated and site affiliation is largely unavailable. The collections are arranged and described by cultural and temporal order, with representative items pictured below. The geographic/cultural areas of Costa Rica include the Greater Nicoya, the Diquis subregion, and the Central Region. The latter can be subdivided into to Atlantic Watershed and the central Mountain region.

Panama

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The Central American collection consists of ceramics, and a limited number of stone artifacts from Costa Rica, Panama, and Nicaragua. All of the items were donated and site affiliation is largely unavailable. The collections are arranged and described by cultural and temporal order, with representative items pictured below. The geographic/cultural areas of Costa Rica include the Greater Nicoya, the Diquis subregion, and the Central Region. The latter can be subdivided into to Atlantic Watershed and the central Mountain region.

Peru

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The South America collection is dominated by artifacts from Colombia and Peru. Lesser collections come from Venezuela and Brazil. The artifacts featured on this page include complete ceramic vessels of varying styles and functions as well as textiles from the Chancay region of Peru. Associated documentation include the catalog number, a basic description, cultural and temporal context, size, and donor.

Colombia

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The South America collection is dominated by artifacts from Colombia and Peru. Lesser collections come from Venezuela and Brazil. The artifacts featured on this page include complete ceramic vessels of varying styles and functions as well as textiles from the Chancay region of Peru. Associated documentation include the catalog number, a basic description, cultural and temporal context, size, and donor.

Olmec

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The Mesoamerican collections consist of both systematically excavated and donated materials. Mesoamerica includes the countries of Mexico, Belize, Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador and various islands. Many of these artifacts are associated with a specific archaeological site, while others are identified only by cultural group or geographical area. Cultural groups include Maya and Olmec, sites are La Venta, Jalisco, Colima. The geographic areas are Valley of Mexico, Veracruz, Oaxaca, and Central Plateau.

Archaeology

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