Idea Café - Shifting Viewpoints: Is Western Science an Indigenous Knowledge?

Subtitle: 
Jorge Soberon, Senior Research Scientist, Biodiversity Institute & Biodiversity Modeling and Policy Professor, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Professor
Event Type: 
General
Date: 
Fri, 12/06/2013 - 10:00am - 11:00am
Location: 
Spooner Hall/The Commons
Contact: 

Questions? Call 785.864.6293 or contact us at thecommons@ku.edu

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So called Indigenous, or Traditional Knowledge (ITK) is viewed by many western scientists with a combination of amusement and doubt, and almost always, implicit judgement. But what if we apply the methods of analysing ITK to western science? After all, western science began its long walk to hegemony as the folk knowledge of the peoples of the Mediterranean region. This exercise will likely prove both illuminating and humbling.

Jurassic Giant Fleas Likely Preyed Upon Hairy or Feathered Hosts

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Writing in the journal Nature this week, KU entomologist Michael Engel and an international research team have described the oldest definitive fleas to date: giant fleas from the Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous of China.

Behind the Scenes: Insects

Event Type: 
General
Date: 
Sun, 02/19/2012 - 3:00pm - 5:00pm
Location Details: 
Public Safety Building, 1501 Crestline Drive, West Campus
Contact: 

Questions? Call 785.864.4450 or contact us at naturalhistory@ku.edu

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For more than 140 years, KU scientists and students have collected and studied Earth's animals and plants. Only a few of these specimens are on display for the public in the exhibits of the KU Natural History Museum; milions more are in jars or on shelves throughout the Biodiversity Institute's research areas.

Collection Methods - Entomology

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Collecting insects requires a variety of different methods. For example, trapping insects at night might require different equipment than during the day. Some insects live in the soil, in or near water, on small plants and on trees, so collection methods change depending on the type of habitat, too. These photographs show some of the collection methods used by Andrew Short, entomology curator, during a 2010 expedition in Costa Rica. Return to the 2011 Costa Rica expedition page.


 

 

Costa Rica 2010

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Curator Andrew Short collected aquatic insects in the rain forests of Costa Rica in 2010, and will return to the country with a research team in July 2011. To follow the group's work, visit the Costa Rica 2011 expedition page.

Why Mosquitoes?

Post classification: 
Adventures Afield
Fieldnotes
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Why mosquitoes?  Of all the amazing and beautiful rain forest animals to study, why would anyone want to work with this lowly, annoying bug that drives us crazy while sitting on porches on summer evenings?  They spread disease, too.  Why would anyone want to mess with that?

Sampling Heliconias

Post classification: 
Adventures Afield
Fieldnotes
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My side project for this trip was to study arthropod diversity in two species of heliconia plants.  I worked on the project with Riley and Tom.  In both species we looked in leaf rolls and in inflorescences of the plant.  We unrolled the leaves and dissected the flower. It was interesting as with each opening it was exciting to see what kind of animals we would find.  We ended up seeing about 10 species repeatedly, but we had some surprises too.

Travel is Education

Post classification: 
Adventures Afield
Fieldnotes

By Bethany Christiansen

Gravity

Post classification: 
Adventures Afield
Fieldnotes
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We are all now back home, having arrived on Monday, bleary-eyed. It's been a long few days, full of travel, packing, unpacking, repacking, and airport-sitting.

We woke early to catch the boat from the CICRA field station to Laberinto, then a bus to the airport, followed by a flight back to Lima. We spent a day and a half in Lima as we pleased, and then we prepared the specimens for their flight back to the U.S.

 

Entomology

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