Collection Conversations: Fishes with Dr. Leo Smith

Event Type: 
General
Date: 
Thu, 01/16/2014 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Cost: 
Free
Location: 
Dyche Hall/Natural History Museum
Contact: 

Questions? Call 785.864.4450 or contact us at naturalhistory@ku.edu

Images
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 Join us to see specimens from the collection of more than 660,000 fishes in the KU Ichthyology collection, from the freshwaters of the Midwest to tropical oceans. Dr. Leo Smith will show examples of deep sea fishes and discuss some of the interesting traits they have developed, including bioluminescence. Collection Conversations are short, informal drop-in events with research scientists about the collections that form the basis of research at the Biodiversity Institute and Natural History Museum. 

Idea Café - Shifting Viewpoints: Is Western Science an Indigenous Knowledge?

Subtitle: 
Jorge Soberon, Senior Research Scientist, Biodiversity Institute & Biodiversity Modeling and Policy Professor, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Professor
Event Type: 
General
Date: 
Fri, 12/06/2013 - 10:00am - 11:00am
Location: 
Spooner Hall/The Commons
Contact: 

Questions? Call 785.864.6293 or contact us at thecommons@ku.edu

Images
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So called Indigenous, or Traditional Knowledge (ITK) is viewed by many western scientists with a combination of amusement and doubt, and almost always, implicit judgement. But what if we apply the methods of analysing ITK to western science? After all, western science began its long walk to hegemony as the folk knowledge of the peoples of the Mediterranean region. This exercise will likely prove both illuminating and humbling.

Behind the Scenes: Fishes

Event Type: 
Field Trip
Date: 
Sun, 11/06/2011 - 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Cost: 
$5-$7 contribution suggested
Location: 
Dyche Hall/Natural History Museum
Contact: 

Questions? Call 785.864.4450 or contact us at naturalhistory@ku.edu

Images
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For more than 140 years, KU scientists and students have collected and studied Earth's animals and plants. Only a few of these specimens are on display for the public in the exhibits of the KU Natural History Museum; milions more are in jars or on shelves throughout the Biodiversity Institute's research areas.

The Oarfish Omen

Post classification: 
The Science Life
Content Image(s): 

A week before the earthquake and tsunami hit Japan, an omen washed up on its beaches. The appearance of the oarfish, a ribbon-like, deep sea fish has long been perceived as a warning that seismic activity is on the way. This fish has become a feature of speculation as to whether they can be used to predict an incoming earthquake.

 

Ichthyology

Established: 
1864
Number of Specimens: 
Geographically and taxonomically diverse tissue collection of 9,500 fishes: 660,000 preserved fishes with an emphasis on the midwest: significant osteological preparations.
Research Strengths: 
Evolution and systematics of teleost fishes.
Curator: 
lsmith
Collection Manager: 
abentley
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New Websites Highlight Biodiversity Research

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The Biodiversity Institute has a new home on the web and a new site for the institute's Natural History Museum.

Prominent on the institute's new web site, biodiversity.ku.edu, are the research, collections and discoveries of its scientists and graduate students who explore and document the life of the planet.

New Biodiversity Institute Web Sites

Hiking, KISS and Projects for Graduate Students

Post classification: 
Flora and Fauna
Fieldnotes

Yesterday I got up early and hiked up into the hills outside of town with one of the professors. We found a beautiful pond at the top and were at last greeted with a view of the elusive Mallard. Still, it’s the first one of the trip. Yay! Then a pair of Phalaropes then came around the corner to smooth things over--that was a nice treat.

Ambassador, Engineer, Musk Ox

Post classification: 
Flora and Fauna
Fieldnotes

This morning getting up early to look for birds, this time down by the rapids at the bridge, proved sadly fruitless. Except there were rapids, which was in itself neat.

On Cleaning an Ancient Fish

Post classification: 
Lab Notes

The word “fossil” often conjures images of Tyrannosaurus rex skulls, mammoth femurs, or other large bones. But those aren’t the only ones that survive through the millennia, and certainly aren’t the only ones that have importance.

Ichthyology

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