Malaise trap

Saturday, June 14, 2014

In a state of Malaise...traps

 
It is now my tenth day in Peru. The rest of the group arrived after I’d been here, alone, for four days. We spent the first couple of days in Lima touring archeological sites and gaining an overview of Peru’s rich history and ancient cultures.

Of course, there was a bit of a snafu at the Lima airport with one of our colleague’s ticket, but thankfully, it was sorted out. I flew a different airline from the rest, since it was a bit cheaper and by the time I was able to purchase my ticket, it was outrageously priced with their airline. So, I arrived in Cusco a few minutes before them and was inundated by organizations trying to sell me everything from a taxi to a hotel to Macchu Picchu entrance tickets. My Spanish has been improving, so I felt fairly safe in communicating with the vendors that no, I did not need anything, I was waiting on my group to arrive. They seemed to get it, or I frightened them.

Wayqecha, our first field station, is in the Andean cloud forest. I may now live in Lawrence, KS, the coldest place on earth, but I still am no fan of cold. One night at Wayqecha was so cold I slept under 4 heavy wool blankets wearing my long underwear, sweatshirt, and an alpaca shawl I had purchased in Lima. The next day I was in shorts.

We discovered that the forests are constantly trying to reclaim trails (trochas) as things grow so fast. We had a little difficulty locating the trail that our professor had previously surveyed. A small building had been built in front of it, that will eventually allow ACA to charge admission to enter this trail to the canopy platform which is supposed to be breathtaking. The vista at Wayqecha is breathtaking, so I have my doubts as to how spectacular this other view must be.

Today, we learned how to select a site for a Malaise Trap, and setting it up for capturing insects in an unattended sampling period. Our location wasn’t ideal for the trap itself as we installed it on a steep slope but it was in an ideal cloud forest, which we wanted to survey. In a week we’ll see if we made the right decision.

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Our first trap

On our third day at Wayquecha Biological Station, we began our adventure walking along the main road in search for a “secret garden gate” that Professor Chaboo described. At first, we were unable to find the gate, until we realized that a clay and bamboo house inscribed with the words “Casa Interpretativa del Manu” now camouflages the path. We walked down the hidden trail and were immediately greeted with an assortment of leaf beetles and grasshoppers. Each one of us on the trip collected some sort of insect or two. After the brief scare of Paige scaling the side of a relatively steep drop off in search of her water bottle, we continued our way down the trail to find a site to set up our first insect trap. Past the “secret garden gate”, we were immersed in a landscape full of new and exciting flora. A bit farther down, we crossed a small, wooden bridge suspended above a waterfall. Then, we continued on an open trail that scaled the side of a mountain overlooking the spectacular cloud forest.

We finally came upon the perfect spot to set up the Malaise trap. This consists of netting that catches insects flying in two directions. A roof of the same material meets the wall of netting and takes advantage of the insect’s instinct to climb upwards. The insect is channeled into a container filled with ethanol. We began by tying the tops of the 6×6 foot net trap to trees with rope and then secured it into the ground with stakes. Meanwhile, Alex circulated around us, filming the entire process. The incline and moistness of the ground made the set up a bit tricky, but we eventually completed the process with success. Afterwards, we took 20 or so minutes to ourselves to explore the beautiful moss-covered rainforest and observe the many other traps set up by other researchers. I think it is safe to say that there is no better location or circumstance in which to learn a field method!