Blogs

Thursday, June 4, 2015

Costa Rica 2015 blog: Introducing Kristen

My name is Kristen Bontrager, I am a senior at Washburn University majoring in Biology with a focus in ecology. Currently I am working on expanding our herbarium collection and documenting the species of oaks in our research plot in Topeka, Karlyle woods.  

My interests include growing plants, the soil composition that they are able to grow the best in including biotic and abiotic matter. In the summer I am usually in my garden, which I bring inside in the colder months and continue to grow in my own semi-greenhouse all winter long. I have a passion for eating food that I know where it comes from, and what exactly the nutrients are. I also enjoy hiking throughout the entire year. As long as I have the proper clothes to wear, I can manage to hike in the snowy months with my dog.

Friday, June 12, 2015

Abundant Biodiversity in Zurqui

Bounding Biodiversity in Zurqui

On Tuesday the ninth we visited the Zurqui field site for the second time.  This time we were going deeper into the park in order to collect specimens from various Zingiberales plants.  As Dr. Chaboo of our University of Kansas and Dr. Mauricio of the University of Costa Rica guided us deeper into the forest, they educated us on the visible biodiversity.  The site were in is labeled as a cloud forest, as its high elevation is in close contact with the clouds, prompting periodical  misting and precipitation on a daily basis.  We were walking along a steep inclined rocky road and the climate was warm and humid, perfect weather for spotting insects.  

One of the first insects of the day, a stag beetle, was spotted by John.  Never before, save Dr. Chaboo’s lab, have I seen a beetle that large.  Without even a close look, its sharpened mandibles menaced from the ground.  Dr. Mauricio advised against making contact with the insect, but a couple of students dared nonetheless and let the beetle make its way up their arms, scurrying all the while.  Since the specimen did not come from a Zingiberales, the order of  plant of our study, there was no need to collect it.  As it was let go, the beetle scurried back into the forest, and I was given my first glimpse of the breadth of taxonomic variety to come.  

On the walls we were able to see liverworts, a common name for one of the first plants to colonize land.  Dr. Chaboo reminded us that we were in the presence of one of the oldest living species of plants, also one of the first major sources of terrestrial oxygen.  This was taught to us all in introductory biology, but this on-site view of these important organisms truly gave a unique perspective on the history of life.  Everyone always seems  fascinated with dinosaurs (especially with Jurassic World coming out in theaters) and older terrestrial animals, but rarely appreciates the truly crucial importance of plants in the grand scheme of life on land.  As I continue in this field course, I will view more organisms that I’ve only ever read about, and I hope to appreciate a new perspective of their role in both history and environment.  


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image above: Dr. Chaboo showing the Biol 418 class liverworts on rock wall in Zurqui. Photograph taken by Vivek.

Friday, June 12, 2015

Exploring Costa Rica

Tim MayesBefore the start of the program I had to pleasure of traveling around Costa Rica with my dad. It was an experience unlike any I have had before. First off I loved all the different chances to experience the difference in culture. For a little while we lived with a Costa Rica family. That was a very eye opening experience, because it showed me that their everyday life isn't that different from ours in the states. Also, eating home cooked food every day we were with them gave me good insight to the typical meals; breakfast never changed, and dinner was essentially the same every time but with a different protein. The other thing I now find very cool is the plants. When I was traveling with my dad I saw a lot of the plant order that we are here to study and didn't even know it. However, now that I have some field experience under my belt I realize I was surrounded by them. I didn't realize how abundant they were here, and I never would have guessed at all the different organisms that live on the plants. I'm looking forward to the rest of our research. All in all it has been a great time so far, and my favorite place was the Manuel Antonio National Park, so I am excited to be returning there for the weekend.

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Costa Rica 2015 blog: Introducing Caroline

I am Caroline Chaboo, Director of this 2015 program to Costa Rica.  Normally, I head to Peru every June with students.  However, this year Costa Rica is on the menu due to several factors and opportunities. The University of Costa Rica and the University of Kansas have a long established relationship of collaboration in research, education and visits.  This program is supported by KU's Office of International Programs.

In 2014, I expanded one aspect of my Peru research, arthropod communities on Zingiberales plants, and sought a  second site for comparative study.  Two UCR colleagues, one I met more than 10 years ago, developed a grant proposal which was funded.  One UCR collaborator visited KU recently (his first visit to the USA). Our plan is to develop a Central American site and study the diversity (taxonomic and food web relations) of the arthropods that are associated with these distinctive Zingiberales plants (familiar ones are bananas and ginger, but flowers are also sold in shops).

The field course program developed as a way to initiate a joint education program alongside the larger research so we could bring KU and UCR students together, conducting research towards their first scientific publication as they gained exposure to rich tropical habitats and acquired several field skills. 

Some KU participants opted to pursue grants for research, which they were awarded. We have met several times to discuss everything, from travel medicine to hiking shoes.  I am excited to renew collaborations with the excellent UCR biology faculty and to expose KU students to Costa Rica = "rich coast" = rich biodiversity. 

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Friday, June 5, 2015

Costa Rica 2015 blog: Introducing Vivek

I am a soon-to-be junior majoring in organismal biology and minoring in Spanish. I enjoy sports, traveling, and trying new things. I am a pre-med student and have recently taken to the task of learning more about the health care of different regions of the world. Going to Costa Rica will hopefully give me a chance to observe firsthand some differences and similarities between the systems there and in the U.S.    

Friday, June 5, 2015

Costa Rica 2015 blog: Introducing Eric

My name is Eric Becker and I’ll be a senior at the University of Kansas.  I’m currently studying organismal biology with an unofficial concentration on entomology with a bit of arachnology.  I’m particularly interested in behavioral biology.  In addition to the research being conducted as part of the course, I’ll be using this opportunity to work with parasitoid wasps, a group of insects I have an interest in. I plan to compile a list of parasitoid wasps in Costa Rica that are attracted to cantharidin, a toxic substance produced by blister beetles.

Friday, June 5, 2015

Costa Rica 2015 blog: Introducing Hannah

My name is Hannah K. Boyd. I am a senior at the University of Kansas majoring in ecology and evolutionary biology. I am broadly interested in the diversity of organisms and their behaviors, herpetology, and entomology. During this study abroad program, I will carry out a study of insect communities on plants of the Marantaceae family and hopefully a niche model study on eyelash vipers (Bothriechis schlegelii). This will be my second time traveling out of the country and conducting research with Dr. Chaboo. Our work last year on the biodiversity click beetles (Elateridae) in collaboration with Dr. Johnson of South Dakota State University, is currently being prepped for publication and we discovered some new species. I am excited to be able to conduct the field research that i enjoy so much in a beautiful country like Costa Rica and hopefully I can learn a little more Spanish this time around. 

Friday, June 5, 2015

Costa Rica 2015 blog: Introducing Jake

My name is Jake Kaufmann. I am studying Visual Art at the University of Kansas. I am participating in the Study Abroad program in Costa Rica because of my interest in the country's environmental sustainability and to enhance my connection to art and science. I am very excited to explore the region's cloud forests and to draw inspiration from the abundance of nature and culture. My goal is to reveal the beauty of environmentalism by depicting the Costa Rican landscape, while conducting field research and interacting with local people. 

 

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Costa Rica 2015 blog: Introducing John

My name is John Kaiser and I will be a junior at KU studying Molecular and Cellular Biology. I have a deep interest in studying organisms on both the ecological and molecular levels. During the Field Biology Program to Costa Rica, I hope to expand my scientific knowledge and research skills by engaging in ecological exploration to better understand the interactions between organisms in the lush ecosystems of Costa Rica. Additionally, I plan on learning more about the Spanish dialect native to Costa Rica in order to better understand the diversification of the Spanish language and culture throughout Central America. -John

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Costa Rica 2015 blog: Introducing Tim

My name is Tim Mayes, and I am about to be a senior at KU majoring in Organismal Biology. I am extremely excited for this trip to Costa Rica. I am leaving early to travel with my dad and cannot wait to immerse myself in this new culture and view a new way of life. Once the program begins I am looking forward to exploring the rainforest and researching the insect life. This will be my first time conducting research so I am interested to see what the process involves. I plan to document as much as possible through a multitude of mediums in order to both remember the trip and aid in the research to be conducted. -Tim