Wednesday, June 4, 2014
Alex Lamb

My name is Alex Lamb and I am a junior at KU.  I grew up in Prairie Village, KS. I study film and journalism at the University of Kansas and am a movie reviewer and filmmaker. I live my life with a sense of adventure and try to explore the unknown, the unusual, and anything I think would make a good story. I am documenting the study abroad program Field Biology of Amazonian Peru through photos, video and audio and will be assembling a documentary/multimedia project from everything I capture in Peru about the environments, the research, the culture, and our experiences.

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Wednesday, June 4, 2014
Sarah Hirschey

My name is Sarah Hirschey and I am a rising senior at Wesleyan University studying Earth and Environmental Science with a concentration in Geochemistry. I am very interested in learning about the interactions between humans and their environment and interactions between biotic and abiotic ecologies. During my study abroad in Peru, I plan to expand my knowledge of these interests by studying phytotelmata and the biotic and chemical environments the plant creates for other organisms.

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Wednesday, June 4, 2014
Paige Emilia Miller

My name is Paige Emilia Miller and I will be a junior at the University of Kansas, studying for a BSc in Biochemistry with a concentration in vector-borne diseases. I will be participating in all the activities of KU’s Study Abroad program, Field Biology of Amazonian Peru, as well as carrying out a survey of mosquito diversity in the Kosnipata Valley. I hope my findings and specimens will develop into a publication. Beyond KU, I am considering joining the Peace Corps and attending graduate school.

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Wednesday, June 4, 2014
Caroline Chaboo

I am Caroline Chaboo, a faculty-curator in the Biodiversity Institute with research interests in biodiversity and leaf beetles. I am the course leader for this field program in Peru and this will be my 8th visit to Peru. Although the group is visiting places I have explored before, the program remains exciting because of our team is different each year. The individual expertise, interests, and perspectives of each individual enhances all our experiences. I am excited for our new adventures together.

Thursday, May 29, 2014
David McLeod

Most of our frogs have come from the permanent pond on the Konza property. We have found four species here: northern cricket frogs, Cope’s gray tree frog, leopard frogs, and bullfrogs. We’ve also found a red-sided garter snake and one particularly unhappy common snapping turtle, shown above.

-Matt Jones, graduate student in geology/vertebrate paleontology.

 

Thursday, May 29, 2014
David McLeod

Chan and studentsWe are about to embark on our second week of fieldwork. Students have had the weekend at home to do laundry and regroup before we head off to Barber County and the Alexander Ranch. I’m told that this will be the first KU party to visit the ranch in 40 years.

Our hope is that with a little rain we might also be among the few to ever hear a chorus of the Red-spotted toad in Kansas. Our second stop will be Baxter Springs in Cherokee County, home to a number of salamanders found nowhere else in the state.

Coachwhip snake

Last week was a great success. I’m so proud of the students! Many are pre-health care students headed for careers as nurses, doctors, and physical therapists. Perhaps unlikely participants in a field biology course, but here they are catching lizards, snakes and frogs. While handing a prairie king snake at the end of last week, one student remarked “If you’d told me a week ago that I’d be wrangling snakes for a photo session, I’d have told you that you were nuts!” Yet, here she was, pillowcase held over the snake on a picturesque rock set against a landscape of sandstone, mixed grasses, and desert plants at Wilson State Lake.

Collared LizardOur most exciting finds last week were the abundance of Collared lizards in central Kansas, the grass-swimming Glass lizard (which has no legs), some “horned toads” (really lizards), and two 5’ long Coachwhip snakes. Who knows what this week will hold. 

-David McLeod, instructorSarah and a snake

Saturday, May 24, 2014
David McLeod

Nicole loves herpetologyI don’t know when the last time was that KU offered a field Herpetology course. Months ago it was decided that this would be a good year to correct for this absence. Our goal: to collect local amphibians and reptiles from different regions of the state to bolster our genetic resources at the BI. 

On May 19th,  12 would-be herpetologists set off on a grand expedition across the state. First stop—Konza Prairie Biological Research Station in the heart of the Flint Hills. This unique tall grass prairie ecosystem reserve boasts a diverse community of amphibians and reptiles, amazing views, and is home to a herd of about 300 bison.

Our first two days at Konza have been outstanding!Bison at Konza Next stop—Wilson State Lake in the Smokey Hills region of Kansas (Russel Co.)

 

 

 

 

Monday, May 12, 2014
Rich Glor

Ventral surface of snake found in basement.

The herpetology division regularly receives requests for help with snake identification. In most cases, this involves a snake that somebody thinks is venomous on or near their home. We recently received a call from someone near Lawrence who believed they had a Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) in their basement. We asked for a photo and description of the snake, but initially received only the blurry ventral photo above. What do you think? Is this a Copperhead?

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Monday, May 12, 2014
Rich Glor

Kinky snake.

The snake photograph above was just taken by a Lawrence resident near the intersection of Kasold and Princeton streets. The snake is clearly a black ratsnake (Pantherophi obsoletu), but why is it so kinky? Did it just swallow a string of ping pong balls? Snake expert and former KU Herpetology trainee Harry Greene offered one possible explanation: "My hunch is that it's root mimicry, a last ditch effort at crypsis--but then I've been accused of seeing mimicry everywhere!"

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014
Jennifer Humphrey

Panorama project

The Panorama was full of families today creating their own diorama. And what better place to do it than the biggest diorama any of them had ever seen? Everyone created a scene in their museum boxes — favorite scenes from books, nature, their family.