Haley Fetters-Crouch

Saturday, June 14, 2014

Spots of color

From Lima, to Wayqecha, to Villa Carmen, spots of bright color have caught my attention. Looking out my plane window from Lima to Cusco, bright blue vernal pools popped out from the muted tan Andean mountains. This same pattern of bright/muted contrasts was also apparent in the bright blue doors on the brown adobe homes that we passed en route to the Wayquecha Biological Field Station. Even during our hikes at Wayqecha, the forest exhibited numerous shades of green, accented by super-bright floras – light pink Protea flowers, red Bromeliad plants, and yellow, purple, or blue Orchids. These splashes of rich color seemed unreal. We even found a flower on our walks that perfectly matched my fuchsia Nike field shirt. These incredible colors reminded me of the woven alpaca goods we saw in the markets and the communities we passed through. Peruvian architecture and products use indigenous materials and also seem inspired by the natural aesthetics of their uniquely colored environment.

-Haley

 

Monday, June 9, 2014

Peru, here we come!

Peru, Here we come!
Peru 2014 GroupI’m finally in Peru, and I have just been reflecting on everything that has happened to get me to where I currently am.
I would see Caroline Chaboo in the hallways of the Entomology Lab, and she would exclaim, “Haley! You are going to Peru with me!” I always took that with grain of salt, for several reasons. What in the world would I do in Peru with a bunch of biology students? Shouldn’t I be getting an Industrial Design internship instead? How in the world would I pay for that kind of trip, anyways? However, all of these things I was worrying about completely disappeared with her help, along with the encouraging words from my Professor, Lance Rake. Dr. Chaboo recommended a type of project for me that would take advantage of the incredible traditional textiles found in Peru; we discussed several people I could contact to talk about Peruvian culture and the textiles, and she also mentored me while writing grants. So, it appeared that I was actually going to Peru.
Last week, starting Monday the 2nd, our study abroad group got together to review our itinerary, the goals, and the expectations.

On Tuesday, we sorted insects. Caroline dumped out a mass of mixed bugs soaked in ethanol into a white tray; she gave me a light, microscope, cylindrical containers, and forceps to start sorting. This was overwhelming, but quickly became fun. I was blown away by what I saw through the microscope. Yes, I have seen these close-ups in photographs on the internet. However, seeing it for yourself in person is a completely new experience, that opens up this tiny little world that is so much bigger than I previously thought.

On Wednesday, we visited the Spencer Art Museum, where we talked with curators, Stephen Goddard and Casey Mesick, about significant art pieces that connected with our Peru travels. Eduardo Kac is an artist who injected his own DNA into a Petunia plant to create the “Enigma,” which is represented in five photographs in the project “The Natural History of the Enigma.” We also saw prints from the original paintings of Isabella Kirkland, from her collected works “Taxa.” Taxa is a group of 6 paintings, each including a specific theme, such as species that are ascending in their natural habitat, species that are declining, species that are used for illegal trade, species that have become extinct, etc. These paintings depict nearly 400 species, and are incredibly detailed! Casey Mesick brought out a few Peruvian textiles, some directly from the Center of Traditional Textiles of Cusco. Most of these textiles were woven from a back-strap method, which is a very simple method of weaving. How incredible though, something so beautiful and complex made with such a simple process. The practice of weaving is very sacred, and takes advantage of Peru’s rich biodiversity, including materials, dyes, and patterns. These specific details really stuck out to me.

Thursday was a packing day. I did not feel prepared, I never felt absolutely ready, especially since I was leaving the country. However, you just need to “just do it,” if you want an adventure. Something I learned from a successful National Geographic photographer, Corey Richards, is that adventures are full of discomfort, but that discomfort is exactly what is so inspiring and what drives you to learn. So Peru, get me out of this comfort zone! Bring on the adventure!
(photos coming soon)

-Haley