Wayqecha

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Up in the clouds, down by the river

One of the biggest surprises for me on this trip was how different Wayqecha, the first field station, was from my expectations of the rainforest. That’s because Wayqecha is in a cloud forest: high in elevation (3000m), cool, and relatively dry. However, we still got soaked on our first hike when the area received its first rain in three weeks.

When we left Wayqecha, we travelled down the Kosñipata valley from the clouds to the tropics, spotting waterfalls along the road and dense vegetation that grew more vivid in its green color. At Villa Carmen, the second field station, I really felt like I was walking into the jungle, as this area fit my expectations of the rainforest.

While I had prepared for the heavy humidity and higher temperature here, I wasn’t ready for it after living in the comfort of Wayqecha. It took me several days to adjust. But the much greater density and diversity of beautiful plants, flowers, and insects make it worth it.

The almost daily rains required a change in routine as well. Sometimes they come late morning or early afternoon, giving us a siesta period to rest after lunch before returning to fieldwork around 2-3 p.m. Other days a downpour begins in the middle of the night and continues until late morning, which limits us from hiking the trails until the afternoon. We wake up too early here for my taste, so I’m not too upset about the extra rest the morning rain provides.

Friday, June 13, 2014

Who knew: So many plants!

Today we took a trail through the cloud forest at Wayqecha. I have never taken a class on plant diversity, so I was amazed by the diversity of plants here. I felt lucky to learn so much on a walk. First, we examined many different species of ferns. I learned that ferns have their reproductive organs (sori) on the underside of the leaf-like frond. As we kept walking down the trail we saw Selaginella, which are considered to be more primitive than ferns. My favorite plants are the Orchids. There are so many kinds here. Since it is winter now in the Amazon, only a few are in flower. Without the flowers, the main way you can tell if a plant is an orchid is by the pseudo-bulb at the base of the leaves. Orchids get their moisture out of the air, so they love humid places like cloud forest. I must think how to keep them in a pot, with bark instead of soil. Next, we found a wispy bromeliad. This one is an epiphyte, which creates a mat on the tree and builds up soil to get its nutrients, but it is not a parasite on the supporting tree. Near the end of the trail, my second favorite plant appeared. It is called Protea and it has pretty pink tube-like flowers. I found this plant particularly noteworthy because it is only found in South America and southern Africa, which shows evidence that a long time ago the two continents were attached, forming Pangaea. Wayqecha is one of the most beautiful places I have visited.